Academic reading list

For project publications see the "Publications" tab, but if you have an ethics-oriented paper, chapter, book or report on emotion-sensing technology, send details to mcstay@bangor.ac.uk in Harvard format and I'll post here.

Kudos to those linking to open access papers.

  • Andrejevic M. 2013. Infoglut: How Too Much Information is Changing the Way We Think and Know. New York: Routledge.
  • Barrett, L.F. (2006) ‘Solving the emotion paradox: Categorization and the experience of emotion’, Personality and Social Psychology Review, 10: 20–46.
  • Barrett, L.F. (2014) What Faces Can’t Tell Us, The New York Times, http://www.nytimes.com/2014/03/02/opinion/sunday/what-faces-cant-tell-us.html?_r=0, accessed 20/11/14.
  • Beer, D. (2016) Metric Power. Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan.

  • Clifford, D. (2017) Citizen-Consumers in a Personalised Galaxy: Emotion Influenced Decision-Making, a True Path to the Dark Side? CiTiP Working Paper Series, 31/2017 https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3037425

  • Crawford, K. Lingel, J. and Karppi, T. (2015) ‘Our metrics, ourselves: a hundred years of self-tracking from the weight scale to the wrist wearable device’, European Journal of Cultural Studies, 18: 479–496.

  • Davies, W. (2016) How are we now? Real-time mood-monitoring as valuation, Journal of Cultural Economy, 10(1): 34-48.

  • Davies, W. (2015) The Happiness Industry: How the Government & Big Business Sold us Wellbeing. Verso: London.

  • Duchenne de Boulogne, G.B. (1990 [1862]) The Mechanism of Human Facial Expression. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

  • Ekman, P. (1989) ‘The Argument and Evidence About Universals in Facial Expressions of Emotions’. H. Wagner & A Manstead, eds. Handbook of Social Psychophysiology. Chichester: Wiley. pp. 143–164.

  • Ekman, P. and Friesen, W.V. (1971) ‘Constants across cultures in the face and emotion’. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. 17(2): 124–129.

  • Ekman, P. and Friesen, W.V. (1978) Facial Action Coding System: A Technique for the Measurement of Facial Movement. Palo Alto: Consulting Psychologists Press.

  • Ellard, C. (2016) Places of the Heart: The Psychogeography of Everyday Life. New York: Bellevue Literary Press.

  • Fridlund, A.J. (1995) Human Facial Expression: An Evolutionary View. San Diego, CA: Academic Press Inc.

  • Gunes and Pantic, M. (2010) Automatic, Dimensional and Continuous Emotion Recognition, International Journal of Synthetic Emotions, 1(1): 68-99.

  • Hildebrandt, M. (2017) Learning as a Machine. Crossovers Between Humans and Machines, https://works.bepress.com/mireille_hildebrandt/77/, accessed 10/10/17.

  • IEEE (2017) Ethically Aligned Design: A Vision for Prioritizing Human Well-being with Autonomous and Intelligent Systems, https://standards.ieee.org/develop/indconn/ec/ead_brochure_v2.pdf, accessed 12/12/17.

  • IEEE (2017a) Affective Computing, https://standards.ieee.org/develop/indconn/ec/ead_affective_computing_v2.pdf, accessed 12/12/17.

  • Kramer, A.D.I., Guillory, J.E. and Hancock, J.T. (2014) ‘Experimental Evidence of Massive-Scale Emotional Contagion Through Social Networks’, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(29): 8788-8890.

  • Layard, R. (2005) Happiness. London: Penguin.

  • Lazzarato, M. (2014) Signs and Machines: Capitalism and the Promotion of Subjectivity. Los Angeles: Semiotext(e).

  • Leys, R. (2011) The Turn to Affect: A Critique, Critical Inquiry, 37(3): 434-472.

  • Leys, R. (2012) “Both of Us Disgusted in My Insula”: Mirror Neuron Theory and Emotional Empathy, Nonsite.org, http://nonsite.org/article/%E2%80%9Cboth-of-us-disgusted-in-my-insula%E2%80%9D-mirror-neuron-theory-and-emotional-empathy, accessed 19/11/14.

  • Lindstrom, M. (2009) Buy-ology: How Everything We Believe About Why We Buy Is Wrong. London: Kogan Page.

  • Lupton, D. (2016) The Quantified Self. Cambridge: Polity.

  • Palti, I. and Bar, M. (2015) A manifesto for conscious cities: should streets be sensitive to our mental needs? The Guardian, https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2015/aug/28/manifesto-conscious-cities-streets-sensitive-mental-needs, accessed 05/06/17.

  • Morozov, E. (2014) To Save Everything Click Here. London: Penguin.

  • Neff, G. and Nafus, D. (2016) Self-Tracking. Massachusetts: MIT Press.

  • Picard, R.W. (1997) Affective Computing. Cambridge, MA: MIT.

  • Picard, R.W. (2007) Toward Machines with Emotional Intelligence, http://affect.media.mit.edu/pdfs/07.picard-EI-chapter.pdf, accessed 15/01/14.

  • Quattrociocchi, W.; Scala, A. and Sunstein, C. (2016) Echo Chambers on Facebook, SSRN, https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2795110, accessed 04/01/17.

  • Richardson, K. (2016) Sex Robot Matters: Slavery, the Prostituted, and the Rights of Machines, IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, 35(2), 46–53.

  • Russell, J.A. (1994) Is There Universal Recognition of Emotion From Facial Expression? A Review of the Cross-Cultural Studies, Psychological Bulletin, 115(1): 102-141.

  • Sampson, T.D. (2016) Various joyful encounters with the dystopias of affective capitalism, Ephemera : Theory and Politics in Organization, 16(4): 51-74.

  • Schreuder, E., Erp, J.v., Toet, A., Kallen V.L. (2016) ‘Emotional Responses to Multisensory Environmental Stimuli: A Conceptual Framework and Literature Review’, SAGE Open, 1-19.

  • Schwab, K. (2016) The Fourth Industrial Revolution. London: Penguin.

  • Scheve, C. von and Ismer, S. (2013) Towards a Theory of Collective Emotions, Emotion Review, 5(4): 406–413.

  • Sedenberg, E. and Chuang, J. 2017. Smile for the Camera: Privacy and Policy Implications of Emotion AI. Available from: https://arxiv.org/abs/1709.00396 [Accessed 30 October 2017].

  • Slaby, J. (2014) ‘Emotions and the Extended Mind’, in von Scheve & Salmela, Collective Emotions, Oxford: Oxford University Press. Pp. 32-46.

  • Stark, L. & Crawford, K. (2015) ‘The conservatism of emoji: work, affect, and communication’, Social Media + Society, 1(2): 1-11.

  • Stiegler, B. (1998) Technics and Time, 1: The Fault of Epimetheus. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

  • Stiegler, B. (2010) For a New Critique of Political Economy. Cambridge: Polity.

  • Tene, O. and Polonetsky, J. (2014) "A Theory of Creepy: Technology, Privacy, and Shifting Social Norms," Yale Journal of Law and Technology, 16(1): 59-102.

  • Turkle, S. (2010) ‘In good company? On the threshold of robotic companions’ in Y. Wilks, ed. Close Engagements with Artificial Companions: Key Social, Psychological, Ethical and Design Issues. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. Pp. 3-10.

  • Turow J. (2017) The Aisles Have Eyes: How Retailers Track Your Shopping, Strip Your Privacy, and Define Your Power. New Haven: Yale.

  • Williams, S. (2000) Emotion and Social Theory: Corporeal Reflections on the (Ir) Rational. London: Sage.

  • Zhao, S. (2006) ‘Humanoid social robots as a medium of communication’, New Media & Society, 8(3): 401.